Friday, July 30, 2010

Stone Tower, Allegany State Park, New York


One of the first trails we followed on Monday (July 26 2010), when we entered the State Park (which is located in the southwestern part of New York State) was up to Stone Tower.


After pulling off the main road, we began our trek up the gravel path.
At the top we were rewarded with the "Stone Tower"
I had a hard time finding any information on the tower, like the history behind it, or the purpose of it. Guess I should have bought a book while I was there.


We tried hard to take pictures that did not show all the graffiti painted and carved on the wood and pretty much completely covering the inside of the building. I read on one site - where the writer said. 'lovers had left their initials where they may have shared a kiss at the top of the world.' Apparently the writer had never been to Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondack Park in Northern NYS, the Tower near the THousand Islands on the Saint Lawrence River or on any other mountain, as opposed to this little hill.



Don't get me wrong, it is a neat structure, but we were disappointed by people's need to 'mark' their moment in time at this little place. The view from the top was pretty, although not all that encompassing. I am sure it would be beautiful in the Fall with a variety of colors.




Tall One headed down the winding stair case to check out the surrounding woods.




Both he and Young One enjoyed getting a few shots of the tower and the sun.

As we were getting ready to leave, I found Tall One laying on the ground trying to get a shot from a different perspective. I took a photo of him ...


Below is the shot that he got ...


I can't help but say I was expecting a little bit more as we went to some of these sights.
As I said before, I wish I had purchased the book that wrote about the history of these areas within the park. But I thought I would be able to find that information somewhere on the internet. I haven't found it yet.

It would have been very helpful in educating the visitors if there could be a sign or plaque near each area giving some info about it - but I suppose that takes away from the 'natural' state of the park.

But this park is largely 'in the raw' ... almost completely natural, with the exception of the man made lakes and buildings. But close to 66,000 acres which have the amazing beauty of the Creator stamped for all to see. Definitely a park that we will go back to.

To read and see more about our Allegany Trip you can read here:




Today I am linking up to Finding Beauty Friday over at Dipity Road.

9 comments:

Claudia@DipityRoad said...

Wow... these are some pretty stunning views!

Love how your family is into photography... it is such a giving hobby. I love it. It's taken me through some rough times and always help me reflect back on the good times they were instead.

Thanks for joining with us at FFB

Hugs
claudia

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Hi, Interesting tower... Too bad they don't provide more info for tourists/hikers... The view is gorgeous though... Sorry about the Graffiti. Why in heck to people think they have to destoy things like that???? DANG!!!!!

Great pictures, Valerie....
Hugs,
Betsy

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

It may not have been all you expected,but it is still a pretty place,and it sounds like you had some good family time.
Blessings,Ruth

A Garden of Threads said...

Fabulous pictures of the tower, thank you for sharing them. Have a great weekend.

Jane said...

Those are terrific views! Have a great weekend,

Jane

Angel said...

What a Fantastic view, and really great shots :) Enjoy your weekend ~

James Beckman said...

I don't know everything about the tower, but I can tell you this much.... My Great Grandfather built it in the 1930s as a fire watch station for park services.

James Beckman said...

I cannot tell you everything about the tower except my Great Grandfather built it in the 1930s as a fire watch tower for park services

James Beckman said...

I don't know everything about the tower, but I can tell you this much.... My Great Grandfather built it in the 1930s as a fire watch station for park services.